All posts by admin

Soul – What is The Soul

http://dorsetghostinvestigators.tv/the-paranormal/soul/
PLEASE SUBSCRIBE & JOIN THE D.G.I FAMILY.

Please follow us on twitter at https://twitter.com/DorsetghostDGI
& like our facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Dorset-Ghost-Investigators/259833150723729

The soul, in many mythological, religious, philosophical, and psychological traditions, is the incorporeal and, in many conceptions, immortal essence of a person, living thing, or object. According to some religions (including the Abrahamic religions in most of their forms), souls—or at least immortal souls capable of union with the divine[—belong only to human beings. For example, the Catholic theologian Thomas Aquinas attributed “soul” (anima) to all organisms but taught that only human souls are immortal. Other religions (most notably Jainism) teach that all biological organisms have souls, and others further still that non-biological entities (such as rivers and mountains) possess souls. This latter belief is called animism. Anima mundi and the Dharmic Ātman are concepts of a “world soul.”
Soul can function as a synonym for spirit, mind, psyche or self.

Linguistic aspects:
Etymology:
The Modern English word soul derived from Old English sáwol, sáwel, first attested to in the 8th century poem Beowulf v. 2820 and in the Vespasian Psalter 77.50, and is cognate with other Germanic and Baltic terms for the same idea, including Gothic saiwala, Old High German sêula, sêla, Old Saxon sêola, Old Low Franconian sêla, sîla, Old Norse sála as well as Lithuanian siela. Further etymology of the Germanic word is uncertain. A more recent suggestion connects it with a root for “binding”, Germanic *sailian (OE sēlian, OHG seilen), related to the notion of being “bound” in death, and the practice of ritually binding or restraining the corpse of the deceased in the grave to prevent his or her return as a ghost.
The word is probably an adaptation by early missionaries—particularly Ulfilas, apostle to the Goths during the 3rd century—of a native Germanic concept, which was a translation of Greek ψυχή psychē “life, spirit, consciousness”.
The Greek word is derived from a verb “to cool, to blow” and hence refers to the vital breath, the animating principle in humans and other animals, as opposed to σῶμα (soma) meaning “body”. It could refer to a ghost or spirit of the dead in Homer, and to a more philosophical notion of an immortal and immaterial essence left over at death since Pindar. Latin anima figured as a translation of ψυχή since Terence. Psychē occurs juxtaposed to σῶμα e.g. in Matthew 10:28:

Music credit to:
Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)”.
Licensed under Creative Commons
“Attribution 3.0”
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Licence for Images in video:
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License
This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license.